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Drunk Driving & How It May Affect Your Life

No one plans to drive drunk, risking injury and putting lives at stake, but nonetheless, it happens every day. If you find yourself in this unenviable situation, it is important to call an expert to defend you, someone who specializes in Driving While Intoxicated cases. While you may feel confident that you are competent enough to defend yourself, there are very compelling reasons to hire someone with expertise in the legal field.

Laws vary from state to state, so it is important to know the DWI laws in your state. DWI, also called Driving Under Influence, or DUI, carries some hefty fines and penalties, so it is best to know what you are up against if you are arrested for driving DWI.

If you believe that you are guilty and plan on pleading guilty to a DWI or DUI offense, you may not need an attorney. It cannot hurt, however, to consult a specialized attorney just to see if you might have a defense. If you would like to fight the case, having a DWI attorney may save you time, money and heartache in the long run. Many factors will come into play in your case, including the results of the field sobriety tests you were given and what your blood alcohol content were at the time of arrest. If you have been arrested for DWI previously, that will also factor into your case. When in doubt of your rights, consult an expert. Even if you feel you have gathered all the evidence and feel prepared, it will be helpful to speak with a lawyer in case you missed important information or to confirm what to expect if you are going to plead guilty.

If this is your first DWI offense and no one was injured, the consequences of the guilty plea may be less severe. And whether or not a lawyer is representing you, a guilty plea is by far the most common result in DUI cases. If someone testifies that you were intoxicated, or your blood or breathalyzer tests indicate your blood alcohol content to be at least .08 percent, or you failed the any sobriety tests when you were pulled over, your chances of being found guilty are much stronger. These are the biggest factors used when a prosecutor looks to get a DWI conviction. This is where an effective DWI attorney can be of immense assistance.

lawWhile you may feel educated and competent enough to attempt a plea bargain with the prosecutor, there may be factors that make an attorney a necessity. If your blood alcohol content is just above the legal limit, an experienced DWI attorney might be able to plea the charge to something that carries a lighter sentence, like reckless driving. Also, a prosecutor is more likely to strike a deal with someone who has legal representation since they do not want to take their chances at a trial if they don’t have a strong case. If you try to bargain with the prosecutor and cannot come to an agreement, he or she will have no qualms about facing you in court. And while you may be a master orator, a legal professional has perfected that sought after combination of legal knowledge, experience, and negotiation skills. Hiring a lawyer with a respected, tough reputation may be enough to dissuade a prosecutor from taking your case to trial.

Other than representing yourself or hiring a DWI attorney, your other option is to have a public defender represent you in court. The public defender is assigned to your case and paid for by the government. This option is available for lower income clients but if it is determined that your income is not low enough, you will have to opt for self-representation or you will need to hire your own attorney.

Driving While Intoxicated or Under the Influence is a serious offense; one that can carry some harsh penalties including the loss of your driver’s license, numerous court appearances, restrictive conditions like an Ignition Interlock device, and possibly even jail time. In addition, you may have to pay for alcohol education classes, fines and even restitution is there is another party involved. While these are financial setbacks, there is also the damage to your reputation—some employers will not hire or will dismiss employees convicted of a DWI offense. All of these add up, financially, emotionally and otherwise, so if paying for a sharp attorney can help you avoid the severe penalties assessed for your crime, it would be money well spent, especially if the attorney is able to plea bargain to a lesser charge.

If you don’t accept the deal offered by the prosecutor—if one is even offered—and you feel that you can prove your innocence, you may go to trial, generally one with a jury. You can represent yourself, you can be represented by a public defender if you financially qualify, or you can invest in a DWI attorney for your defense. The reasons for professional legal representation might not be apparent, especially if you have a knowledge of the law; however, you may be skilled at washing windows, but an expert would catch the streaks and spots you would miss. This is true of a criminal defense / DWI lawyer—he or she can review the facts of your case, gather evidence to present, and duly represent your case in front of the judge or the jury, if it is a jury trial. The defense attorney has seen it all, and he or she may have previous information from another case that may benefit your case. Since the attorney is also versed in the rules of law, they may be able to find a mistake made by police during your arrest that will result in a lesser charge or the charge being dismissed altogether.

Finding an experienced DWI attorney takes some work but it can be well worth your time in the end. Ask friends, family and co-workers for recommendations and research the attorney yourself. A good reputation and outstanding results are earmarks of an excellent defense attorney. Remember, however, that someone whose practice is dedicated to DWI/DUI defense will have the most experience, but he or she might be more expensive than someone who also takes additional types of cases. Arrange a consultation with the attorney and ask about his or her courtroom philosophy and make sure you are comfortable with the attorney. If the costs associated with the defense is too high, see if you can set up a payment arrangement. While the cost may seem expensive to hire representation, it can wind up being costlier WITHOUT representation.

 

Featured post

corn chowder with chile, lime and cotija

I evicted a longtime resident of my To Cook list this week with this corn chowder. I have no argument with traditional corn chowder — it has cream, bacon, and potatoes and thus would be impossible not to love as soup or salad — but I adore to the point of boring everyone around me with my gushing, Mexican-style corn either elote-style (on the the cob rolled in butter, mayo, lime juice and coated with salty crumbled cotija cheese and chile powder or a chile-lime seasoning blend) or esquites-style (all of the above, but in a cup). This corn chowder attempts to celebrate the best of both.

making a mess of the kitchencutting kernels from the cornassistantblended and whole corn kernels

I started with a classic corn chowder using whole and blended fresh kernels, onion, garlic, milk, and cream but added some jalapeño and chili powder for flavor and used cooked black and small red beans instead of potatoes for bulk. Then, right before you eat it, because I am fully of the conviction that finishes are what make a soup, you make a rich street corn-like dressing with mayo, sour cream, cheese, and lime and dollop it right into the center of the soup. Squeeze more lime all over, shake on some chili powder and finish it with fresh cilantro and, if you’re not sure you’ve gilded the lily enough (or, perhaps, have children still viewing this meal skeptically), bake some corn tortilla wedges into chips.

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crispy spinach pizza

I went through a phase this summer where I couldn’t stop making crispy spinach pizza, but I had no plans to tell you about for a couple reasons, the first of which is it’s absolutely hideous. It looks like someone melted Oscar the Grouch onto a pizza dough and little I did improved this, not making it round, nor rectangular, in good light nor light so dim that maybe you wouldn’t notice it at all.

a soft dougha great heap of spinacha round pizzait looks like too much but it's too little!

Crispy spinach pizza isn’t its official name (that’s, in fact, The Popeye) but in our household dish names are marketing devices and heaps of spinach are, understandably, a hard sell. It’s not much easier with adults. Yes, I know many of us enjoy green vegetables and volunteer to eat them on the regular, but even as one of those people, I felt nothing but panic and dread the first time I saw this unsettlingly large pile of charred-edge greens and no sign of cheese or any other anchors of joy coming across the room to me at the late Co., and knew I’d ordered all wrong.

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breakfast burritos

The first time I made breakfast burritos the way I like them — that is, the eggs softly scrambled and never dry, busy with vegetables, and nothing terrifying like hot, wet lettuce inside, second only to eating them in front seat of your car in an Austin parking lot on a chilly morning, a Topo Chico in the cup holder (i.e. maybe not exactly the way I like them, but real life requires compromises, or so you adults keep telling me) — I felt woundingly betrayed. It seemed like every cooking website on the internet made them seem so simple, but there I was with separate skillet-fuls of bacon and greens and mixed vegetables and eggs, and then more bowls than I could count for assembly. We were going to have them for an “easy” breakfast-for-dinner that night; dinner was spectacularly late and everyone was hangry and ate my 90 minutes of prep in less than 5, further insult to injury. Never again, I vowed, never.

mostly what you'll need

Fortunately I vowed this on Instagram Stories, which means that my DMs were quickly filled up halfway with “Me too!Why does everyone lie about how easy they are?” and the other half with suggestions of ways to make them more efficiently and intelligently.

diced potatoesi have strong opinions about how peppers should be choppedinto the ovenroasted vegetables

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flapjacks

One of the things I obsessively collect in my cooking life — aside, apparently, from container lids with no bases and jars of mustard seeds because every time a recipe requires it I presume I’m out because of that one time in 2010 I was — is recipes with very short ingredient lists. It’s not revolutionary to learn that, say, a salad can be made with just lettuce, oil, and vinegar or to find tomato bread, or basil pesto on these lists, but Marcella Hazan’s 3-ingredient tomato sauce is indeed something pretty revelatory, especially when you’re short on time to go to the store or merely patience to cook. So is this Minimalist Barbecue Sauce, Bacon Corn Hash, this summer squash pizza topping that could convert anyone to zucchini, and if does not, this Quick Zucchini Sauté will, the omelet that’s basically Spain’s national dish (and mine), and let us never forget all of the magical things that happen when you let fresh raspberries, brown sugar, and sour cream blister under a broiler, or roast a sweet potato until it almost candies itself inside. It’s not fully populated (I keep finding things I’ve missed and taking liberties when the 6th ingredient is butter or olive oil) but I finally got to pulling together a few of my favorites in this collection this summer. Life is busy; it’s here to help.

what you'll need + oats
a caramel base
stir to combine

Despite all of this, I am a deeply contradictory person. While I assure you that these recipes don’t require any more ingredients than listed to fulfill their delicious destinies, if you were to try to tell me about a recipe with a set number of ingredients, I’d immediately bristle at the limitation. “What was the 6th one? Maybe I have it! I really don’t mind taking it out!”

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foolproof cacio e pepe

Soon, extremely soon, I’m going to tell you more about our 12 days in Andalucía but before that, before summer is truly over, before I start thinking about cooking more complex meals again, before I even consider turning on the oven again, I wanted to tell you that this summer was the year I finally figured out how to make cacio e pepe, one of my favorite pastas, as good at you’d have in Rome, and we cannot let the summer end until you do too.

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layered mocha cheesecake

Last Friday at 3 pm, when we had dinner plans at 6, I decided it had been too long since I’d gotten myself into a right mess of a baking project and decided to make my husband a cheesecake for his birthday — which we were already 14 hours into. I’d been dawdling because despite having 11 cheesecake recipes on this site, I find cooking things I’ve already made before boring, and was working up the courage to tackle a harebrained idea for a cheesecake that had thin stacked layers.

made it in a food processorpar-baked crustseasiest cheesecake batterflavoringsespresso batterchocolate batter

[Does Deb have a thing for thin stacked cakes? I don’t know. Judge for yourself.]

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focaccia sandwiches for a crowd

Last year, Alexandra Stafford published a very good book about bread. It sprang from a recipe for the peasant bread her mother made often when she was growing up. When she shared it on her site, it went viral, which is no surprise given that it’s no-knead, comes together in under five minutes, rises in about an hour, and after a brief second rise, you bake it in buttered bowls that form it into a blond, buttery crusted bread that she boasts is “the antithesis of artisan.” Because there are no hidden tricks; no steam ovens, special flours, lames to score the crust, or bannetons to shape the loaves. Her central tenet is that “good bread can be made without a starter, without a slow or cold fermentation, without an understanding of bakers’ percentages, without being fluent in the baking vernacular: hydration, fermentation, biga, poolish, soaker, autolyse, barm.” (None of those words appear in the book.) She knows that there are a lot of no-knead breads out there, but this is the only one that can be started at 4pm and be on the dinner table at 7.

what you'll needwhisk flour, salt, and yeastadd waterlet it proof for an hour

I realize you’re thinking, as I briefly worried before I read it, how does one write an entire cookbook based on one recipe? But Stafford is a gifted recipe developer, and there isn’t a thing in this book — one part breads (with all types of flours, grains, and shapes, including pizzas, flatbreads, rolls and buns), one part toasts (including sandwiches, tartines, stratas, panzanellas, soups, summer puddings and so much more), and one part crumbs (a celebration of crunchy gratin toppings, stuffing, burgers, eggplant parmesan, fish sticks, meatballs, and brown bettys) — that I didn’t want to make. (I suspect that having four kids to feed ensures that these recipes were vetted by the most finicky of reviewer classes.) It’s also a gorgeous book, with a focus and format that my inner, long-surrendered organized person finds deeply pleasing.

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marbled raspberry pound cake

This small, fearless wildling we literally just brought home from the hospital turned three a couple weeks ago, but despite my certainty that we just got her, I won’t lie, this feels like a gazillion years ago because when did she not have hair. Strangers on the street often ask us about her hair, and I get it, I do. She’s small, it is big, and also red and with spiral curls going in every direction and there are three other members of our family and none of us have spiral curls or red hair. This isn’t the only way she’s already her own fierce little person. I was definitely not into dolls or dresses growing up, so I watch with awe as she plays for hours with her very pink baby doll, the doll’s stroller, the doll’s purse, the doll’s crib and high chair; when she comes home after being out all day, she likes to sit quietly with her baby on her lap on the sofa for a while to catch up and it is, objectively (I am known for my objectivity when talking about my kids), one of the cutest things I’ve ever seen.

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minimalist barbecue sauce

Every summer, I promise that I’m going to tell you about this shortcut barbecue sauce I use when I don’t have it in me to bring home 11 bottles and jars plus 2 vegetables for what I consider the ultimate, Queen Ina’s. I love that one, regardless. I make it every year or two and I freeze it in 1-cup packages. Sometimes, like last summer, I completely forget to freeze it and find it in the fridge 8 months later and it’s completely and totally fine to eat? It’s pretty magical like that. But it’s not simple. And most of the time, when it’s just weeknight chicken or tofu skewers on the grill or even as a base for what I call Fake Baked Beans (more on this at the end), three ingredients is all you need, plus up to two more to your tastes. Don’t look askance at me; I bet you already have them all.

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bourbon peach smash

Most conversations about shrubs go like this.

“Wait, like the green bushy things that grow in the ground?”
“No, it’s a drink.”
“A leafy drink?”
“No, it’s actually just three ingredients — fruit, sugar, and vinegar…”
“Wait, you drink vinegar? Why would you drink vinegar?”
“Well, we love sour things like lemon and lime in drinks, they complement sweet flavors…”
“So there’s booze in this?”
“… Sometimes. Sometimes it’s just a soda.”
“Well, that sounds nice.”

[Note: They are being polite.]
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corn fritters

We used to fritter on the regular. The earlier archives of this site are filled with favorites that got us through many snacky toddler meals and excesses of vegetables: broccoli-parmesan, zucchini, cauliflower-feta, cabbage and mixed vegetables with an okonomiyaki vibe, mixed vegetables with a pakora-spiced vibe, and of course, potato latkes in every shape and form. According to the date stamps, it’s been over 5 years since we last frittered, and this is unacceptable, especially as we are again deep in the toddler years.

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